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Welcome to the new Antelope Garden Club website
We are located in Chino Valley Arizona
We meet the first Thursday of every month  at the Chino Valley Community Church
located on the Northeast corner of Hwy 89 and Road 3 North. Meetings start at 6:30pm

Find more about Weather in Chino Valley, AZ
Click for weather forecast

Scroll down for more club happenings.

Whipstone Farms

A special thank you to Whipstone Farms for inviting our garden club to tour the farm. We enjoyed it very much.

This entry was posted on October 8, 2014, in Gardening.

Gardeners, Fall is the time for planting

Quote:  ‘How lovely is the silence of growing things’  author unknown

Autumn is here and we look forward to this beautiful season. For many of us,
it is our favorite time of the year. The cool, crisp mornings are welcome
after summer’s heat and the garden plants are so happy. We find dew on them
in the mornings, and sometimes there is a cool, moist fog hugging the
lowlands until the sun burns it away.
It’s Planting Time!
September is the best time of the whole year to plant trees, shrubs and
perennials and spring-blooming bulbs. Planting in the fall eases transplant
shock and allows  time to establish a good strong root system before winter
arrives.  Once spring comes, the plants will be able to grow and thrive.
Plant new plants by digging a hole twice as wide and as deep as the
container. Check for good drainage by filling the hole at least half full of
water and monitoring it to see how long it takes for the water to drain
away. If there is still standing water after several hours, you may have
poor drainage and will need to take steps to fix that problem. Plants do not
thrive in poor drainage situations because the roots need to breathe.
If the water does not drain away fast enough, it stagnates and the roots rot
and die.
There may be a layer of caliche, which is a natural material of calcium
carbonate that binds other materials such as silt, sand, gravel or clay into
a non-permeable substance. You can punch holes into the bottom of the hole
so that it can drain if the caliche is a thin layer. If it is a thick layer,
you may have to move your planting hole to a different location.
Some other options are planting on a mound, or digging a French drain to
carry the water away from the planting hole.
So don’t be shy, get out there and plant something!
Spring Bulbs
When you plant spring-blooming bulbs such as daffodils, tulips and
hyacinths, remember to add bone meal or bulb food to each planting hole to
ensure greater flower production.
Tiny bulbs like crocus and grape hyacinth need food, too.  Remember that
tulip bulbs are like candy to javalinas. Plant those in pots out of reach of
animals.
Veggie Beds
Fall is a great time to clean up those beds where the veggies are done
producing. By cleaning up and amending these beds now, you have a jump start
on being ready for spring planting. Pull out the old vegetable plant
material and put it on your compost pile, omitting any diseased plants.
These should go into the trash bin so they will not spread their problem.
Dig up the bed and then add some amendments such as compost, mulch,
well-rotted manure, bone meal, alfalfa meal and/or worm castings. Work them
into the soil and cover the whole bed with a 4 inch layer of straw, watering
it well to moisten everything. Then leave it alone until spring except for a
once or twice a month watering during the winter. Another option is to plant
a cover crop such as rye or clover. Let it grow into early spring, then till
it under for a green manure.
Planting onions and garlic
Now is a great time to plant onion sets and garlic cloves. Plant them in
your amended beds making sure they are covered with straw. Plant them so
that the very tip of the set or clove is visible. Water them at the time you
plant and then every 2 weeks or so all through the winter. They will start
to grow now and will take off in early spring giving you onions and garlic
by June or July.  Plant them at the edge of your garden so that once the
tops start to die off next summer, you can stop watering them.
Look for other timely garden information in the future.
Check out our website at www.antelopegardenclub.com.
If you love to garden or are just beginning to learn, join us for a meeting.
Times and dates are posted on our website.
Written by Valerie Phipps ACNP

This entry was posted on October 8, 2014, in Gardening.

Penstemons a water wise choice for your garden

 

This is the perfect plant to add to your hummingbird garden. The Penstemon eatonii is native to the western states of the United States and is perfect addition to your Arizona garden.

 

The plant has spikes of clustered, tubular, scarlet red blossoms with yellow hairs on their lower lip which is what inspires the common “beard” name to the flower; the flowers are very attractive to hummingbirds.

 

If you are planting a garden in hopes of attracting a hummer, these will most likely do the trick . They multiply and will quickly need to be divided.

 

One of the largest collections of penstemon species in North America is found at The Arboretum at Flagstaff, which hosts a Penstemon Festival each summer.

 

Penstemon blooms from Feb-April

 

At maturity it can reach 24-36” inches high and 15” wide

Penstemon(mary barnes)

Another Successful Plant Sale

IMG_1176 IMG_1175 IMG_1170We’d like to thank all of you that attended our plant sale this year. The funds we raise allow us to maintain public gardens in Chino Valley . A special thanks to our contributors without whom this sale would not be possible.

Contributors include:
Plants:
   Antelope Garden Club Members and Friends
   Bonnie Plant Farm
   Color Spot
   Earthworks Landscape & Supply
   Mortimer Nursery & Landscaping
   Valley Tree Farm
   V&P Nurseries Inc.
   Watters Design & Garden Center
Site:  Walgreen’s, Chino Valley
Raffle donation:  Wilby’s Compost  

Tables: Friends of the Library

 

This entry was posted on May 12, 2014, in Events.

Donation to Heritage Middle School

With proceeds from our plant sale we purchased the bark and plants .  There are 2 tree planters and 2 planters of plants.  The plants are hard to see, but they are a Boxwood in the middle and thyme and sedums around it.  They did not want any plants that would attract bees, and they wanted low maintenance.  IMG_0926 IMG_0925 The school grounds people did the planting.

 

Donation to Chino Valley High School

image001This year proceeds from our annual plant sale have allowed us to donate gardening tools to the Chino Valley High School. The students have two green houses and will start by growing tomatoes. They are in need of more garden tools so anyone who has extra tools at home please contact the high school to make a donation.

This entry was posted on September 9, 2013, in Events.